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Food and Drink

Feeding Your Invalid in the 19th Century 7: Please, Sir, Can I Have More?

The Victorians adored gruel so much that the variations were endless – rice, flour, arrowroot, groats (a mixture of grains), cornmeal, toast, sago. It was the go-to food for everybody who was frail. As Mr. Woodhouse, in Jane Austen’s EMMA, says, “I recommend a little gruel to you before you go. You and I will

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There’s Tea, and Then There’s Tea

Ah, tea…that most English of meals…but which meal is it? Well, that kind of depends. Tea was introduced in England as early as 1635 but didn’t become fashionable until the 1660s, when King Charles II married the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza. Tea drinking was already established in Portugal, and Catherine brought tea and her

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Feeding Your Invalid in the 19th Century 5: Ale Caudle

Because Christmas is coming, here’s a more cheery recipe that you might even try. Ale caudle was possibly quite good for you. When Marian Halcombe‘s beloved husband Theophilus Camlet is injured in a carriage accident, he spurns sago gruel in favor of ale caudle, thus ensuring that he survives to have further adventures. There’s nutritive

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BVC Announces BVC Eats: Recipes from the Authors of Book View Cafe edited by Marissa Doyle and Shannon Page

BVC Eats: Recipes from the Authors of Book View Cafe edited by Marissa Doyle and Shannon Page Cooking is as creative a process as writing, as the authors of Book View Café demonstrate in this first ever BVC cookbook.

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