Liminal Stories: an interview with the author of The Inconvenient God

Francesca Forrest’s The Inconvenient God  is technically a novella (maybe even a novelette by some counts) but has been published as a slim book by Annorlunda Books, which specializes in shorter works. It’s an elegant book featuring a gorgeous cover by … Continue reading

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It Happened at the Ball

  Last summer after yet another wave of bad news, I found myself longing for escapist feel-good wish-fulfilment, and what is more indicative of escapist wish fulfilment than a ballroom filled with grand costumes, beguiling music, intrigue and romance? I … Continue reading

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A keyhole into medieval life–Gillian Polack’s Langue[dot]doc 1305

Tired of generic medievaloid historical novels? How about reading one written by someone who has studied the period, and knows the real deets—with a plot you can’t predict? Gillian Polack’s Langue[dot]doc 1305 newly out from Book View Café, is about a … Continue reading

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A Most Dangerous Woman: A New Victorian Serial Adventure

When Wilkie Collins—close friend of Charles Dickens—published his fifth book, The Woman in White,  (found here in a collection of all his work, for a buck ) in spite of outrage on the part of critics, it was a runaway … Continue reading

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Theory of Mind: Literature and Writing

Theory of Mind is the ability to attribute mental states—beliefs, intents, desires, pretending, knowledge, etc.—to oneself and others, and to understand that others have beliefs, desires, intentions, and perspectives that are different from one’s own. It is a fascinating study that … Continue reading

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Word of Mouth

Recently twelve Book View Café writers participated in a Giveaway in a no-cost effort to try to reach new readers. On the last day, I asked here (mirrored here) how people discovered new books—if they liked newsletters, giveaways, publicity blitzes, … Continue reading

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Tremontaine: When Collaboration Really Works

I find all kinds of collaborations interesting, from the centuries-long shared-world collaboration of Arthuriana among Europeans to the amazing Mahabharata of India. I think the greatest collaborations are more than the sum of their parts. Nowadays, collaborations are happening in … Continue reading

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