CAFE READS: DANSE DE LA FOLIE, by Sherwood Smith

A Discerning Dance! Sherwood Smith has delivered a delightful “sweet Regency” novel for fans of the genre.  I’d have to say that for both historical accuracy and adapting the “silver fork” genre for modern readers, Smith did a wonderful job.  … Continue reading

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Author Interview: Sara Stamey

Sara Stamey’s journeys include treasure hunting and teaching scuba in the Caribbean and Honduras; backpacking Greece and New Zealand; operating a nuclear reactor; and owning a farm in Southern Chile. Sara Stamey’s novel Islands, now in ebook from Book View Cafe, is set in the Caribbean and packed with both adventure and intricate characters and plot. It’s also romantic suspense with a drop of psychic wonder. “An archeologist investigating petroglyphs ends up diving for sunken treasure and investigating a cult murder.”

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Flying by the Seat of Your Pants: Third Option–Labyrinth Walker

Hang around writers long enough, and eventually you’ll be at a kaffeeklatsch or dinner or late night talk at a hotel bar, and someone will say to you, “Are you a plotter or pantser?”

I propose a third kind of plotting technique; labyrinth walking.

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Recommending Night Calls by Katharine Eliska Kimbriel

This is one of those books I wish had been published when I was eleven years old, along with Terry Pratchett’s Tiffany Aching stories. Since the book wasn’t published until thirty years after I really needed it, I’ve had to make do with loving it in my adulthood.

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TALES OF UNEASE 4: DIA DE MUERTOS REDUX

(If you read yesterday’s post by Kat Kimbriel, you can jump to the More section for today’s vignette!) We’re approaching a shifting, liminal time of year; it’s halfway to winter in the northern hemisphere, and halfway to summer in the … Continue reading

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TALES OF UNEASE 1: BEGGAR’S NIGHT

To honor the coming of the dark side of the northern year, I’ve written some vignettes. They will probably end up as writing snippets in my new book, because one of the characters is a writer who has a slightly skewed vision. I think of them as Tales of Unease.

Because I don’t care much for the gore of horror. But those teasing stories of suggestion?

Oh, yes. . . .

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