Marching For Families in DC

 On a blazing hot day in DC we are marching for immigrant rights! Here I am with Scott Edelman, and that may be Lauretta Nagel in the back. It is unusual to successfully meet up with friends at these things. Even with the help of cell phones the crowd is usually too immense. Preliminary estimates are that there were about 30,000 people there. We rallied at Lafayette Park, named in honor of a famous foreigner, across from the White House. The Post informs me that eventually the march ended at the Justice Department. We bailed out before then, searching for water and shade. However we were able to hear Lin-Manuel Miranda sing! This is not a particularly good picture, but you can see him on the jumbotron.

I’ve been asked why it’s worth marching. Have the protests changed anything much? They are inspiring,of course. But IMO the most important thing is to stand, and be seen to stand, against evil. You can’t always dress up like a bat and fight crime. But you can at least speak up. If someone asks whether we just turned away from oppression and inhumanity, well, a whole lot of us stood up against it.

Share

About Brenda Clough

Brenda W. Clough spent much of her childhood overseas, courtesy of the U.S. government. Her first fantasy novel, The Crystal Crown, was published by DAW in 1984. She has also written The Dragon of Mishbil (1985), The Realm Beneath (1986), and The Name of the Sun (1988). Her children’s novel, An Impossumble Summer (1992), is set in her own house in Virginia, where she lives in a cottage at the edge of a forest. Her novel How Like a God, available from BVC, was published by Tor Books in 1997, and a sequel, Doors of Death and Life, was published in May 2000. Her latest novels from Book View Cafe include Revise the World (2009) and Speak to Our Desires. Her novel A Most Dangerous Woman is being serialized by Serial Box. Her novel The River Twice is newly available from BVC.

Comments

Marching For Families in DC — 4 Comments

  1. [ “I’ve been asked why it’s worth marching. Have the protests changed anything much? They are inspiring,of course. But IMO the most important thing is to stand, and be seen to stand, against evil. You can’t always dress up like a bat and fight crime. But you can at least speak up. If someone asks whether we just turned away from oppression and inhumanity, well, a whole lot of us stood up against it.” ]

    YES! Even, HELL YES!

    Here, over the Bridge in the blazing heat — twice! They Say about 30,000 here too for that event. There were other demonstrations, smaller, in other parts of the city too.

  2. We are all from immigrant families. We need to let the authorities know they have stepped over the line.

    Some people march, some make phone calls, some write postcards and letters. Some write and edit for subversive anthologies. “Alternative Truths”, “More Alternative Truths” and coming soon “After the Orange” and “Alternative Theologies,” from B-Cubed Press. A share of each sale goes to ACLU. P.S. some authors have donated their share of the profits as well.

  3. Absolutely. A good example is before us even today in the news. Scott Pruitt resigned, he says because of the unrelenting pressure. And what does this say to us? It says that it is effective to sternly rebuke (or support) your public official, whose salary and benefits (and soundproof phone booth and first class air ticket) you pay. But they are always impressed by vast numbers of voters, almost as impressed as they are by large sums of money.
    Which is the other major way to go. We joined the ACLU in November 2016, along with about a million other Americans. My husband signed us up on line, and gloomily reported that the online store was sold out. Tee shirts, mouse pads, all the merch had been cleaned out by worried Americans.
    And, all of us: vote. Plan to vote in every election from now until you die. You can see what happens when we don’t.