Worldcon Report 3: The Center of the World

by Brenda W. Clough

My husband has never been to England. He routed through Heathrow once, on his way to more distant parts. So clearly we had to come early and Do All The Tourist Things. A significant fraction of the planetary population is doing the same thing this week; London is something like Disneyland only with crime. All the trains are full, every restaurant and pub is crowded, all the sights are thronged, and the bobbies look harried and tired. However! This does not slow us down at all!

Here I am sitting on the edge of the big fountain in Trafalgar Square. Surely this is the navel of the world; loiter here long enough and everybody passes this spot. We also went into the National Gallery and saw the Van Dyck painting of George Gage, who is the spitting image of the hero of mu novel. And we got cheap tickets to see THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ERNEST, which is not quite the Wilde play — if there is interest I can discuss.

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About Brenda Clough

Brenda W. Clough spent much of her childhood overseas, courtesy of the U.S. government. Her first fantasy novel, The Crystal Crown, was published by DAW in 1984. She has also written The Dragon of Mishbil (1985), The Realm Beneath (1986), and The Name of the Sun (1988). Her children’s novel, An Impossumble Summer (1992), is set in her own house in Virginia, where she lives in a cottage at the edge of a forest. Her novel How Like a God, available from BVC, was published by Tor Books in 1997, and a sequel, Doors of Death and Life, was published in May 2000. Her latest novels from Book View Cafe include Revise the World (2009) and Speak to Our Desires. Her novel A Most Dangerous Woman is being serialized by Serial Box. Her novel The River Twice is newly available from BVC.

Comments

Worldcon Report 3: The Center of the World — 1 Comment

  1. The trains aren’t full in August, which is the quiet time when a lot of people are on holiday from their work, and there aren’t enough tourists to make up the numbers in the rush hour. Come back in February, and they’ll really be full.