WWW Wednesday 7-31-2013

It’s WWW Wednesday. This meme is from shouldbereading.

I’m a slow reader and don’t have a lot of reading for myself time.  I also have numerous books going at one time–a different one stashed by each sitting place.  So I don’t do these often.

• What did you recently finish reading?

“The Last Lion” by William Manchester.  This massive biography of Winston Churchill runs 1112 pages on my Nook.  And this is Volume I.  The last 80 pages are notes, bibliography and footnotes.  Lots and lots of footnotes. The original copyright is 1961 with a later update and reissue.  The author had the advantage of actually meeting Churchill as a young man.

Manchester is quite readable, not caught up in his own ego about convoluted sentences and overuse of esoteric vocabulary.  He does exhaust his subject with amazing details.  His exploration of the late Victorian and Early Edwardian society that shaped both Winston Churchill and his parents was repeated almost word for word in a documentary film on PBS “Secrets of the Manor House.”  I did stumble and skim 40 pages of the politics that guaranteed the Gallipoli campaign in World War I failed.  Important information but not my personal cup of tea.

The details of Churchill’s family life and daily pursuits brought a great deal of loveable humanity to one of the great heroes of the modern era.  Highly recommended reading.  But take your time.  It’s worth it.

 

• What are you reading now?

I just started “The Doomsday Vault” by Steven Harper.  The first chapter with Clockwork plague victims becoming Zombies almost turned me off.  I do not do Zombies.  But the story of the characters who live in his Steampunk world triumphed over the nastiness.  I am fascinated by his interpretation of steam powered airships and may steal some of it…

 

• What do you think you’ll read next?

Not certain.  I have several things lined up on my Nook–“Dead Man’s Hand” by Pati Nagel, (BVC) “Rotten Row” by Chaz Brenchley, (BVC) and  “Deeds of Men” by Marie Brennan.(BVC)  But tonight my brother is bringing me an old paperback of the original “Phantom of the Opera.”  That may trump everything else for a while.

 

What about you? What have you been reading lately? Put the link to your WWW Wednesday entry in comments, or just tell us!

 

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About Phyllis Irene Radford

Irene Radford has been writing stories ever since she figured out what a pencil was for. A member of an endangered species—a native Oregonian who lives in Oregon—she and her husband make their home in Welches, Oregon where deer, bears, coyotes, hawks, owls, and woodpeckers feed regularly on their back deck. A museum trained historian, Irene has spent many hours prowling pioneer cemeteries deepening her connections to the past. Raised in a military family she grew up all over the US and learned early on that books are friends that don’t get left behind with a move. Her interests and reading range from ancient history, to spiritual meditations, to space stations, and a whole lot in between. Mostly Irene writes fantasy and historical fantasy including the best-selling Dragon Nimbus Series and the masterwork Merlin’s Descendants series. In other lifetimes she writes urban fantasy as P.R. Frost or Phyllis Ames, and space opera as C.F. Bentley. Later this year she ventures into Steampunk as someone else. If you wish information on the latest releases from Ms Radford, under any of her pen names, you can subscribe to her newsletter: www.ireneradford.net Promises of no spam, merely occasional updates and news of personal appearances.

Comments

WWW Wednesday 7-31-2013 — 3 Comments

  1. Reading Manchester on Churchill next to Churchill’s own autobiography was quite enlightening. I wasn’t surprised at the number of quotes so much as how Manchester frequently used the same wording.

    Just finished Katharine Kerr’s Sorcerer’s Luck. I reviewed it over at Goodreads: basically, I loved the story, loved the way she takes the familiar underpinnings of urban fantasy and twists them. Most of all, I loved the intelligence and emotional evolution of the central relationship.

  2. Read: The Treachery of Beautiful Things by Ruth Frances Long –beautiful book — not too treacherous. Reviewed here
    Reading: The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
    To Read: Not sure. I think The Queen’s Necklace by Teresa Edgerton is likely to feature in the near future.