Category Archives: Writers on Writing

Alma’s Bookshelf: Letters from the Fire

  I tell people that I was born in a country that no longer exists – and it doesn’t, not on the maps, not in atlases, not on globes. It has vanished into history, now. But the land that the … Continue reading

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Posted in contemporary, Genres, Memory, Politics, Writers on Writing | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Confessions of a Ghostwriter: Scene-Craft
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My favorite clients are the ones that ask questions, because it means they’re curious enough about the process of writing that they want to understand it. Those questions may be specific: ”On page 50 of my manuscript, why did you … Continue reading

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In Praise of Fanny Price

I have been doing one of my semi-regular Jane Austen re-reads. Every time I find new things: This time I was chagrinned to realize the extent to which certain film versions had overwritten Miss Austen’s original text in my mind–not … Continue reading

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Posted in Books and Reading, Characters, regency, Writers on Writing | Tagged , | 25 Comments

Writing Nowadays–Everyone and Back Story

I was at the grocery store a few days ago and the checkout clerk turned out to be a Handsome Young Man with a shock of red-brown hair, foxy features, and a short beard.  His arms sported several tattoos, including … Continue reading

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Madness and the Age of Innocence

Back when I was nineteen years old and steeped up to my innocent ingenue ears in the Matter of Britain, I dreamed up a story – technically a novel, I guess, seeing as it was over 40,000 words, but not … Continue reading

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Posted in feminism, Genres, Historical fantasy, Memory, Publishing, Writers on Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Writing Nowadays–Differentiating Dialogue

When you’re writing dialogue, every character should speak differently from every other character.  No two characters should have the same speech patterns or word choices. This creates extra work for the author, but it’s well worth it.  The characters come … Continue reading

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Sentence-like Sequences of Words
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Today, communication fans, I’d like to dismantle four sentence-like sequences of words that have something in common: muddled meanings caused by a poor (or possibly clever) choice of words. Who said them and with what intent is irrelevant to the … Continue reading

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Posted in Culture, journalism, Writers on Writing | 1 Comment

BVC Announces The Usual Path to Publication, edited by Shannon Page

The Usual Path to Publication, ed. Shannon Page

An essay collection of the many UNusual, inspirational, bizarre, even dreadful tales of how writers actually got published–and how even that is not the end of the story. Continue reading

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Posted in Book View Cafe publications, eBooks, New Releases, nonfiction, Writers on Writing | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Consideration of Works Past and Present: The Man in the High Castle

(Pictures from here and here.) I have this nasty habit of bringing up Philip K Dick in any SF conversation with the slightest pretext. Other people like Heinlein or Asimov or Bacigalupi—which I do as well. Don’t get me wrong. … Continue reading

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Career Ups and Downs

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As part of her Practical Meerkat’s 52 Bits of Useful Info for Young (and Old) Writers, “Laura Anne Gilman offers some savvy perspective on surviving the dry spells. She writes, “Remember, a few weeks ago, when I said that every career … Continue reading

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