Author Archives: Nancy Jane Moore

About Nancy Jane Moore

Nancy Jane Moore is a founding member of Book View Cafe. Her most recent BVC ebook is Walking Contradiction and Other Futures, a collection of her science fiction adventure stories. She also recently released Ardent Forest, a retelling of As You Like It set in post-apocalypse Texas. Other BVC e-books include Conscientious Inconsistencies, a collection of short fiction first published in print by PS Publishing; Flashes of Illumination, a collection of very short stories; and the novella Changeling, first published by Aqueduct Press. Her short stories and essays are also available in most of the BVC anthologies and her work has appeared recently in the anthologies How Beer Saved the World and Best Laid Plans.

Legal Fictions: The End of Lawyers?

In a recent podcast of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy,  Karl Schroeder opines that technology will replace lawyers. Not only will this happen in the far future world he envisions in his novel Lockstep, but “we’re headed there in … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: A Side Trip Into the World of Co-ops

ACBA

Last weekend I went to the Co-op Summit put on by the Austin Cooperative Business Association. I came home very energized about the future of co-ops, so I wanted to share some of my experiences. Perhaps the most exciting thing … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: Why Is the Alliance Evil?

Serenity

I just watched Serenity again. I’m a huge Joss Whedon fan, and while I would have preferred 8 years of Firefly to a movie – I love good serial storytelling – Serenity is an excellent movie. Unlike the recent Veronica … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: What Are Lawyers Good For?

I was reading an article in the New Republic about ageism in Silicon Valley.  Extreme ageism: It seems the 21st Century update on “Never trust anyone over 30” is  “Never hire anyone over 30.” As I read, the instances of … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: Asimov’s Laws of Robotics Are Not Enough

Science fiction writers have been following – or deliberately rejecting – Isaac Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics since he first wrote about them in the 1940s. But now that we live in a world where robots are vacuuming our floors … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: D-I-V-O-R-C-E

Last week in the comments to the WWW Wednesday post, Brenda Clough  and Sherwood Smith got into a discussion on divorce in earlier times. Sherwood observed: Divorce is all tied up with women’s rights. Indeed it is, because while divorce … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: State and Federal Law in the U.S.

In looking at how U.S. law works, it’s useful to remember the full name of the country: the United States of America. We’ve got 50 of those states, plus the District of Columbia (which ought to be a state), and … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: Equal Opportunity

Bottlenecks

I’d like to see more imagination in the development of legal and government systems in science fiction. The use of monarchies or feudal societies in far future stories particularly annoys me, because it assumes that human beings won’t ever change … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: The Truth, the Whole Truth, and Nothing But …

Fire Logic

I recently re-read Fire Logic, the first volume in the fabulous Elemental Logic series by Laurie J. Marks, and found myself focusing on a key aspect of the legal system. In Shaftal, disputes and criminal activities are resolved by a … Continue reading


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Legal Fictions: Stereotypes

legal pad

I started this series with the idea that it would be easy. I know a lot about law and lawyers and I figured the hardest part would be translating what I know from legalese to English. But the process of … Continue reading


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