Author Archives: Marissa Doyle

About Marissa Doyle

Marissa Doyle originally planned to be an archaeologist but somehow got distracted. At long last, after an unsurprisingly circuitous path, she ended up writing historical fantasy for young adults (the Leland Sisters series) and contemporary fantasy for slightly older ones, most recently By Jove from Book View Cafe. She is obsessed by the Regency period, 19th century stuff in general, and her neurotic pet bunny. Visit her at www.marissadoyle.com

Still Here

This last year found me doing something I don’t usually do—namely, working on a couple of projects that aren’t set in the 19th century (gasp!) One of those projects is a story set in the United States in 1917, just … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Research | Tagged , , | 12 Comments

Ackermann Goes Steampunk

Not too long ago I posted about the engraving of a wonderful reading chair that appeared in the early 19th century magazine, Ackermann’s Repository, but this print may just win the prize…not only for itself, but for what the editors … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Oh, the Ennui

The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, a popular weekly magazine published in London between 1822 and 1847, ran the following short piece in its November 26, 1825 issue which got me giggling–I hope it will do the same to … Continue reading

Share
Posted in History, Humor, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Mall-rats, 19th century style or, Meet the Beadles!

When Lord George Cavendish, younger brother of the 5th Duke of Devonshire (or should I say brother-in-law of the famous Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire?) inherited one of the family homes in London, Burlington House, he didn’t expect to be plagued … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

Nevertheless, She Persisted: Alea Iacta Est

Somewhat paradoxically, the inspiration for my story in an anthology about the persistence of women was my son. He’s a software engineer and a long-time gamer, originally of card-based games like Magic: the Gathering and later of on-line MMO RPGs … Continue reading

Share
Posted in anthologies, Gaming, History, Uncategorized, Writers on Writing | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

I Scream…

One of the surest signs of summer where I live is the sudden disappearance of popsicles and ice cream sandwiches from local grocery stores’ freezers on the first really warm day of the season. Ice cream is extremely popular in … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

A Bandalore by Any Other Name

It is a truth universally acknowledged that historical research is probably the most fun you can have with your corset on. I was doing research on Eton in the early nineteenth century a week or so ago, and was on … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 10 Comments

Lawn Ornaments, Garden Furniture, and Hermits

As 19th century tourists meandered about the English countrysides in search of the picturesque, guidebooks in hand as they viewed scenic vistas and visited stately homes surrounded by artfully planned “natural” landscapes, they might pause to admire a grotto here, … Continue reading

Share
Posted in gardening, History, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Corporal Violet

Violets. Aren’t they pretty? Such a charming picture to print—or rather, re-print in Ackermann’s Repository of the Arts. The original image was a hugely popular one around France in 1814 and early 1815, so much so that it was quickly … Continue reading

Share
Posted in History | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Chair Amie

For a writer of historical(-ish) fiction, one of the joys of research has been collecting prints from (and when I can find them, full editions of) an early 19th century English publication called the Repository of Arts and Literature, Commerce, … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 7 Comments