Author Archives: Brenda Clough

About Brenda Clough

Brenda W. Clough spent much of her childhood overseas, courtesy of the U.S. government. Her first fantasy novel, The Crystal Crown, was published by DAW in 1984. She has also written The Dragon of Mishbil (1985), The Realm Beneath (1986), and The Name of the Sun (1988). Her children’s novel, An Impossumble Summer (1992), is set in her own house in Virginia, where she lives in a cottage at the edge of a forest. Her novel How Like a God, available from BVC, was published by Tor Books in 1997, and a sequel, Doors of Death and Life, was published in May 2000. Her latest novels from Book View Cafe include Revise the World (2009) and Speak to Our Desires.

A Trip to France 12: Citadel and Millau

by Brenda W. Clough  A rainy day means museum. The museum at Millau is pretty small, but because the Romans had a famous pottery works here they have more pottery than you would believe possible. The factory shipped all around … Continue reading

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A Trip to France 11: Severac-le-Chateau

by Brenda W. Clough  Ah, the medieval villages of France! We are staying in Severac-le-Chateau, in the central Averyon district on the central massif. It is almost unbelievably picturesque — the only American equivalent may be found (I regret to … Continue reading

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A Trip to France 10: Necropolis and Bridge

by Brenda W. Clough  The tradition in Rome was to bury the dead outside the city. Christians developed the notion of burial in ‘sacred ground,’ which is to say in or around a church. This rapidly became impossible in cities, … Continue reading

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A Trip to France 9: More Vaison-la-Romaine

by Brenda W. Clough We had not realized the Roman site at Vaison-la-Romaine was so enormous, so we went back. Most of the old Roman town is under contemporary construction, but a tobacco millionaire at the beginning of the 20th … Continue reading

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A Trip to France 8: Glanum

by Brenda W. Clough  Roman towns were often named after local dieties, who in turn were in charge of the water. Nimes was originally Nemausus, named after the Gauls’ Nemausus who presided over the artesian spring. And today we went … Continue reading

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A Trip to France 7: Vaison-la-Romaine

by Brenda W. Clough  Did I mention there are a -lot- of Roman ruins in southern France? The place is called Provence, which means ‘province’ — the Romans needed no other name for it. It was their main and favorite … Continue reading

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A Trip to France 6: Arles

by Brenda W. Clough  One of the most beautiful sites in France, surely, is the great arena at Arles. Everything the Romans built here is made of the local stone, a lovely golden color and cheaply available. As you can … Continue reading

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A Visit to France 3: Nimes

by Brenda W. Clough  The town of Nimes is spelled with a cironflex over the ‘i’, but I can’t persuade this Ipad to do accents, so you’ll just have to live with it. It was the center of Gallo-Roman culture, … Continue reading

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The Language Attic: Ovine

by Brenda W. Clough  One of the pleasures of magazines on the Internet is finding great writers. I am not for instance in the readership demographic for Esquire magazine but now I read their splenetic political columnist Charles Pierce daily. … Continue reading

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A Trip to France 5: Pont du Gard

by Brenda W. Clough  This beautiful site is not actually a bridge, as its name indicates. It’s actually an aqueduct, a fantastic work of engineering that supplied water to the regional Roman capital of Nimes. Later on, the medieval residents … Continue reading

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