BVC Eats: COMFORT FOOD Dill Vegetable Dip

A garden bed of green, lacey dill plants

Dill plants

I can feel a few of you flinch from across the miles–Dill? Dill is pungent–it will knock your socks off!

Dill, carefully controlled, can be marvelous in a sour cream and real mayo dip. It was one of those easy dishes to teach a child, and one of two dips* my mother always tossed together for a quick party.

Here’s the basic recipe for the Dill Vegetable Dip. Do not approximate–extra herbs can change the balance, and Beau Monde is a mix. Extra mayo makes it smoother and oilier, so we stuck to 12 oz of sour cream to 8 oz. of mayo.

1 1/2 cups (12 oz.) real sour cream
1 cup (8 oz.) Hellman’s Real Mayonnaise**
2 Tbsp. minced dry onion***
2 Tbsp. dry shredded parsley
2 tsp. dried dill weed
2 tsp. Spice Islands Beau Monde seasoning

First swirl your sour cream and mayo together. Then sprinkle in your dried ingredients as you stir. I add them one at a time and mix by hand to get thorough blending.

Don’t taste it yet! The minced dry onion will be crunchy and the dip will have little flavor. Place in a container with a lid and refrigerate at least an hour–several hours is better. When you retrieve the dip you will have an awesome accompaniment to raw vegetables, plain corn chips and potato chips, and even baked potatoes.

Do you have a comfort dip you share far and wide?

*********
* (The second dip was using Lipton dried French Onion soup with sour cream. I can’t have that anymore–wheat gluten, yeast, and sulfites in the mix–but I have even dreamed of that one!)

** There are many wonderful regional mayos you could use–or make your own. But I don’t recommend a sandwich spread for this particular recipe. You need the sour cream-mayo mix.

***We’ve done the conversion and used dried onion powder instead of minced, so that can be done. But fresh anything gives you a very different dip.

Dill plants photo By H. Zell – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

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About Katharine Eliska Kimbriel

Cat Kimbriel is working on a a contemporary fantasy about curses, ecological change, and very different ways of looking at the twilight worlds. She's still working on a short Nuala piece and mulling over a new Alfreda novel. You can find her fantasy & science fiction, including free samples, at her Book View Café bookshelf. Cat builds worlds that contain compassion and justice -- come join the journey.
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9 Responses to BVC Eats: COMFORT FOOD Dill Vegetable Dip

  1. There’s no such thing as too much dill, in my book. 🙂

    Also, I’ve taken to replace sour cream with no-fat Greek yogurt in dips and dressings, and am very pleased with the texture and consistency (and flavor.)

  2. Elena says:

    I won’t touch store-bought dips, but I love making my own. I think it has some vague similarities to yours, but it’s more of a summer dip. Quantities are fairly vague – depends a lot on what’s in the herb bed and the size of the sour cream container.

    1 large (2 cup) container of sour cream
    1 yellow or red bell pepper
    1-2 dill pickles – I use the low salt ones
    A good-sized handful of parsley
    A small handful of chives – or about ½ a green onion
    ¼ (at most) of a red onion
    Salt
    Pepper
    Paprika

    Mince together everything but the sour cream and then mix thoroughly. Definitely go with less onion until you’ve tasted it! They’re the most unpredictable element depending on the strength of the onion. Salt and pepper to taste.

    Sometimes I’ll add a sprig or two of dill to it, but not always – depends on how much of that has come up that year (some years the stuff lives up to it’s name of dill-weed). Right now it’s the parsley that’s living up to the term “weed”.

    The first time I made this for a party, the entire container got eaten – I found myself in the kitchen trying to scrounge together a second batch!

  3. pence says:

    Onion plus an acid – vinegar or lemon or lime juice will eliminate that extra bite that upsets some digestions. And red onion that has sat in lime juice for half an hour goes translucent red all the way through -pretty. I tend to combine it with hot peppers as a quick pickle garnish. Probably combining that with sour cream would make an interesting dip.

    • Cat Kimbriel says:

      Do you know if the thing in raw onion that so upsets some people is dulled or neutralized by soaking in lime juice? I’m thinking of a friend with IB who can’t do onions unless they are cooked about six hours.

      • pence says:

        According to what I have read it does. That was one of the points made in the original recipe that put me on to the technique.
        I haven’t tested this on a subject though.

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